Best Food for Crested Geckos

Best Food for Crested Geckos: A Complete Guide

Best Food for Crested Geckos Best Food for Crested Geckos

Crested geckos are one of the most popular and easy-to-care-for reptile pets in the world. They are cute, colorful, and have a unique personality. But what do they eat? And how can you feed them the best food possible?

In this article, you will learn everything you need to know about crested gecko food, including:

By the end of this article, you will be able to provide your crested gecko with a balanced and nutritious diet that will keep them healthy and happy.

Key Takeaways

  • Crested geckos are omnivores that eat a mixture of fruits, insects, and a small amount of vegetables.
  • In the wild, they eat mostly insects and nectar from flowers and fruits. In captivity, they can eat live insects, commercial foods, and fresh or pureed fruits.
  • The best insects for crested geckos are crickets and roaches, as they are high in protein and calcium. The best fruits for crested geckos are blueberries, mango, strawberries, and bananas, as they are low in acid and high in sugar. The best vegetables for crested geckos are squash, okra, carrot, and kale, as they are high in fiber and vitamins. The best commercial foods for crested geckos are Repashy, Pangea, and Zoo Med, as they are specially formulated for crested geckos and contain all the essential nutrients they need.
  • You should feed your adult crested gecko every other day and your juvenile crested gecko every day. You should offer them a variety of foods and rotate them regularly. You should also provide them with fresh water at all times.
  • You should avoid feeding your crested gecko foods that are high in acid, salt, preservatives, or additives, such as citrus fruits, baby food, dairy products, or human junk food. These foods can cause digestive problems, dehydration, or even death for your crested gecko.
  • You should also monitor your crested gecko’s appetite, weight, and feces, as these can indicate their health and well-being. If your crested gecko stops eating, loses weight, or has abnormal feces, you should consult a veterinarian as soon as possible.

What Do Crested Geckos Eat in the Wild?

Crested geckos are native to New Caledonia, a group of islands in the South Pacific. They live in tropical forests, where they are active at night and hide in the trees during the day.

In the wild, crested geckos eat mostly insects and nectar from flowers and fruits. They have a sticky tongue that helps them catch and swallow their prey. They also have teeth that help them crush and chew their food.

Some of the insects that crested geckos eat in the wild are:

  • Crickets
  • Roaches
  • Worms
  • Moths
  • Flies
  • Ants
  • Spiders

Some of the fruits and flowers that crested geckos eat in the wild are:

  • Figs
  • Papayas
  • Bananas
  • Guavas
  • Hibiscus
  • Orchids
  • Bromeliads

Crested geckos do not eat vegetables in the wild, as they are not readily available in their natural habitat. However, they may occasionally eat some leaves or stems that contain water or minerals.

Crested geckos do not need to drink water in the wild, as they get enough moisture from their food and the environment. They lick the dew or raindrops from the leaves and branches to hydrate themselves.

What Do Pet Crested Geckos Eat?

Pet crested geckos can eat the same foods as wild crested geckos, but they also have some other options that are more convenient and accessible for owners. These include:

  • Live insects
  • Commercial foods
  • Fresh or pureed fruits

Live insects are the closest thing to the natural diet of crested geckos, as they provide them with protein, calcium, and other nutrients. However, they also have some drawbacks, such as:

  • They can be expensive, messy, noisy, or smelly.
  • They can carry parasites, bacteria, or pesticides that can harm your crested gecko.
  • They can escape, hide, or die in the enclosure, creating a hygiene problem.
  • They can bite, scratch, or injure your crested gecko, especially if they are too large or too many.

Commercial foods are specially formulated for crested geckos, as they contain all the essential nutrients they need in a convenient and easy-to-use form. However, they also have some drawbacks, such as:

  • They can be boring, bland, or unappealing for your crested gecko, especially if they are not varied or rotated regularly.
  • They can spoil, mold, or dry out if they are not stored or replaced properly.
  • They can lack some of the natural flavors, textures, or benefits of live insects or fresh fruits.

Fresh or pureed fruits are a great way to supplement your crested gecko’s diet, as they provide them with sugar, vitamins, and antioxidants. However, they also have some drawbacks, such as:

  • They can be high in acid, which can irritate your crested gecko’s mouth or stomach.
  • They can be low in calcium, which can cause metabolic bone disease or other health problems for your crested gecko.
  • They can attract flies, ants, or other pests that can contaminate your crested gecko’s food or enclosure.

The best way to feed your pet crested gecko is to offer them a variety of foods and rotate them regularly. This will ensure that they get a balanced and nutritious diet that will keep them healthy and happy.

The Best Insects for Crested Geckos

Insects are the best source of protein and calcium for your crested gecko, as they are similar to what they eat in the wild. However, not all insects are created equal, and some are better than others for your crested gecko.

The best insects for crested geckos are:

  • Crickets
  • Roaches

These insects are high in protein and calcium, easy to digest, and widely available. They also come in different sizes, so you can choose the ones that are appropriate for your crested gecko’s age and size.

You should feed your crested gecko insects that are no larger than the space between their eyes, as larger insects can cause choking or impaction. You should also feed your crested gecko insects that are alive and moving, as dead or dying insects can lose their nutritional value or cause infections.

You should also prepare the insects before feeding them to your crested gecko, by following these steps:

  • Gut-load: This means feeding the insects a nutritious diet for at least 24 hours before offering them to your crested gecko. This will enhance the nutritional value of the insects and make them more beneficial for your crested gecko. You can use commercial gut-load products or fresh fruits and vegetables, such as carrots, apples, or leafy greens.
  • Dust: This means coating the insects with a fine powder that contains calcium, vitamin D3, and other supplements. This will prevent calcium deficiency and metabolic bone disease in your crested gecko, as well as boost their immune system and overall health. You can use commercial dusting products or make your own by mixing calcium carbonate, vitamin D3, and multivitamins.
  • Offer: This means placing the insects in a shallow dish or bowl that your crested gecko can easily access and see. You can use a plastic, ceramic, or metal dish, as long as it is clean and stable. You can also use a feeding ledge or a suction cup dish that attaches to the side of the enclosure, as this will mimic the natural feeding behavior of your crested gecko.

You should feed your adult crested gecko insects once or twice a week, and your juvenile crested gecko insects three or four times a week. You should offer them as many insects as they can eat in 15 minutes, and remove any leftovers after that.

The Best Fruits for Crested Geckos

Fruits are a great source of sugar, vitamins, and antioxidants for your crested gecko, as they are similar to what they eat in the wild. However, not all fruits are created equal, and some are better than others for your crested gecko.

The best fruits for crested geckos are:

  • Blueberries
  • Mango
  • Strawberries
  • Bananas

These fruits are low in acid and high in sugar, which makes them ideal for your crested gecko’s taste buds and digestion. They also have a soft and juicy texture, which makes them easy to mash and offer to your crested gecko.

You should feed your crested gecko fruits once or twice a week, and alternate them with insects and commercial foods. You should offer them a small amount of fruits, about a teaspoon per gecko, and remove any leftovers after 15 minutes.

You should also prepare the fruits before feeding them to your crested gecko, by following these steps:

  • Wash: This means rinsing the fruits under running water to remove any dirt, pesticides, or bacteria that can harm your crested gecko.
  • Peel: This means removing the skin or peel of the fruits, as they can be hard to digest or contain toxins for your crested gecko. You can use a knife, a peeler, or your fingers to do this.
  • Mash: This means mashing the fruits with a fork, a blender, or a food processor to create a smooth and consistent puree that your crested gecko can easily lick and swallow. You can also add some water to adjust the consistency and hydration of the puree.
  • Offer: This means placing the puree in a shallow dish or bowl that your crested gecko can easily access and see. You can use the same type of dish as for the insects, or you can use a bottle cap, a plastic lid, or a spoon. You can also use a feeding ledge or a suction cup dish that attaches to the side of the enclosure, as this will mimic the natural feeding behavior of your crested gecko.

The Best Vegetables for Crested Geckos

Vegetables are a good source of fiber and vitamins for your crested gecko, as they can help them digest their food and prevent constipation. However, vegetables are not a staple food for crested geckos, as they are low in protein and calcium and high in oxalates and phytates, which can interfere with the absorption of minerals.

The best vegetables for crested geckos are:

  • Squash
  • Okra
  • Carrot
  • Kale

These vegetables are high in fiber and vitamins, low in oxalates and phytates, and have a soft and moist texture, which makes them easy to chop and offer to your crested gecko.

You should feed your crested gecko vegetables once or twice a month, and mix them with fruits or commercial foods. You should offer them a small amount of vegetables, about a teaspoon per gecko, and remove any leftovers after 15 minutes.

You should also prepare the vegetables before feeding them to your crested gecko, by following these steps:

  • Wash: This means rinsing the vegetables under running water to remove any dirt, pesticides, or bacteria that can harm your crested gecko.
  • Chop: This means cutting the vegetables into small pieces, about the size of a pea, that your crested gecko can easily swallow. You can use a knife, a grater, or a food processor to do this.
  • Cook: This means cooking the vegetables in boiling water or in the microwave for a few minutes, until they are soft and tender. This will make them easier to digest and more palatable for your crested gecko. You can also add some water to adjust the consistency and hydration of the vegetables.
  • Offer: This means placing the vegetables in a shallow dish or bowl that your crested gecko can easily access and see. You can use the same type of dish as for the insects and fruits, or you can use a bottle cap, a plastic lid, or a spoon. You can also use a feeding ledge or a suction cup dish that attaches to the side of the enclosure, as this will mimic the natural feeding behavior of your crested gecko.

The Best Commercial Foods for Crested Geckos

Commercial foods are the most convenient and easy-to-use option for feeding your crested gecko, as they contain all the essential nutrients they need in a balanced and complete formula. However, commercial foods are not a substitute for natural foods, and they should be used as a supplement or a backup option for your crested gecko.

The best commercial foods for crested geckos are:

  • Repashy
  • Pangea
  • Zoo Med

These commercial foods are specially formulated for crested geckos, and have a high-quality and varied ingredient list, including insects, fruits, vegetables, vitamins, minerals, and probiotics. They also have a long shelf life and a good reputation among crested gecko owners and breeders.

You should feed your crested gecko commercial foods once or twice a week, and alternate them with insects and fruits. You should offer them as much commercial food as they can eat in 15 minutes, and remove any leftovers after that.

You should also prepare the commercial foods before feeding them to your crested gecko, by following these steps:

  • Mix: This means mixing the commercial food powder with water, according to the instructions on the package. This will create a thick and smooth paste that your crested gecko can easily lick and swallow. You can also adjust the amount of water to change the consistency and hydration of the paste.
  • Store: This means storing the unused commercial food powder in a cool and dry place, such as a refrigerator or a cupboard. This will prevent the powder from spoiling, molding, or losing its nutritional value. You can also store the mixed paste in the refrigerator for up to 48 hours, but you should discard it after that.
  • Offer: This means placing the paste in a shallow dish or bowl that your crested gecko can easily access and see. You can use the same type of dish as for the insects, fruits, and vegetables, or you can use a bottle cap, a plastic lid, or a spoon. You can also use a feeding ledge or a suction cup dish that attaches to the side of the enclosure, as this will mimic the natural feeding behavior of your crested gecko.

How Often and How Much Should You Feed Your Crested Gecko?

The frequency and quantity of feeding your crested gecko depend on several factors, such as their age, size, activity level, and appetite. There is no one-size-fits-all answer, but there are some general guidelines that you can follow.

As a rule of thumb, you should feed your adult crested gecko every other day and your juvenile crested gecko every day. This is because adult crested geckos have a slower metabolism and growth rate than juvenile crested geckos, and they can store fat in their tail for energy. Juvenile crested geckos, on the other hand, need more food to support their rapid growth and development.

You should also offer your crested gecko a variety of foods and rotate them regularly. This will prevent them from getting bored, picky, or malnourished. You can use the following table as a reference for how to feed your crested gecko:

Age Insects Fruits Vegetables Commercial Foods
Adult Once or twice a week Once or twice a week Once or twice a month Once or twice a week
Juvenile Three or four times a week Three or four times a week Once or twice a month Three or four times a week

You should offer your crested gecko as much food as they can eat in 15 minutes, and remove any leftovers after that. This will prevent overfeeding, underfeeding, or wasting food. You can use the following table as a reference for how much food to offer your crested gecko:

Food Type Amount per Gecko
Insects No larger than the space between their eyes
Fruits About a teaspoon
Vegetables About a teaspoon
Commercial Foods As much as they can eat in 15 minutes

You should also provide your crested gecko with fresh water at all times. You can use a shallow dish or bowl that your crested gecko can easily access and see. You can also use a misting bottle or a dripper to create water droplets on the enclosure walls and plants, as your crested gecko may prefer to lick them. You should change the water daily and clean the dish or bowl weekly.

You should also monitor your crested gecko’s appetite, weight, and feces, as these can indicate their health and well-being. If your crested gecko stops eating, loses weight, or has abnormal feces, you should consult a veterinarian as soon as possible.

FAQs

In this section, we will answer some frequently asked questions about crested gecko food, based on the people also ask section from Bing for the keyword.

Can Crested Geckos Eat Baby Food?

Baby food is not recommended for crested geckos, as it may contain too much sugar, salt, preservatives, or additives that can harm your crested gecko’s health. Baby food is also low in calcium, which can cause metabolic bone disease or other health problems for your crested gecko.

Instead of baby food, you should feed your crested gecko fresh or pureed fruits, such as blueberries, mango, strawberries, or bananas. These fruits are low in acid and high in sugar, which makes them ideal for your crested gecko’s taste buds and digestion. They also have a soft and juicy texture, which makes them easy to mash and offer to your crested gecko.

You can also feed your crested gecko commercial foods, such as Repashy, Pangea, or Zoo Med. These commercial foods are specially formulated for crested geckos, and contain all the essential nutrients they need in a convenient and easy-to-use form. They also have a long shelf life and a good reputation among crested gecko owners and breeders.

How Long Can Crested Geckos Go Without Food?

Crested geckos can go without food for a few days, but not longer than a week. This is because crested geckos have a slow metabolism and can store fat in their tail for energy. However, going without food for too long can cause stress, dehydration, or starvation for your crested gecko.

There are some possible reasons why your crested gecko may stop eating, such as:

  • Stress: Your crested gecko may be stressed by changes in their environment, such as temperature, humidity, lighting, enclosure, or cage mates. You should try to keep their environment stable and comfortable, and avoid any sudden or drastic changes.
  • Illness: Your crested gecko may be sick or injured, and may lose their appetite as a result. You should check your crested gecko for any signs of illness or injury, such as lethargy, weight loss, swelling, bleeding, or discharge. You should also consult a veterinarian as soon as possible.
  • Shedding: Your crested gecko may be shedding their skin, and may stop eating during this process. This is normal and natural, and you should not worry. You should provide your crested gecko with enough humidity and hiding places, and avoid handling them until they finish shedding.
  • Brumation: Your crested gecko may be brumating, which is a form of hibernation that some reptiles undergo during the winter. Your crested gecko may slow down their activity and metabolism, and may eat less or not at all. This is normal and natural, and you should not worry. You should provide your crested gecko with enough warmth and light, and offer them food and water regularly.

If your crested gecko stops eating for more than a week, you should try to stimulate their appetite by offering them their favorite foods, such as insects, fruits, or commercial foods. You can also try to hand-feed them or use a syringe to gently squirt some food into their mouth. You should also consult a veterinarian if the problem persists.

What Should I Not Feed My Crested Gecko?

There are some foods that you should never feed your crested gecko, as they can cause serious health problems or even death for your crested gecko. These foods include:

  • Chocolate: Chocolate contains caffeine and theobromine, which are toxic for crested geckos. Chocolate can cause seizures, tremors, or heart failure for your crested gecko.
  • Avocado: Avocado contains persin, which is toxic for crested geckos. Avocado can cause vomiting, diarrhea, or respiratory distress for your crested gecko.
  • Citrus Fruits: Citrus fruits, such as oranges, lemons, or grapefruits, are high in acid, which can irritate your crested gecko’s mouth or stomach. Citrus fruits can also cause mouth rot, ulcers, or infections for your crested gecko.
  • Dairy Products: Dairy products, such as milk, cheese, or yogurt, are high in lactose, which crested geckos cannot digest. Dairy products can cause bloating, gas, or diarrhea for your crested gecko.
  • Human Junk Food: Human junk food, such as chips, cookies, or candy, are high in salt, sugar, fat, or artificial ingredients, which can harm your crested gecko’s health. Human junk food can cause obesity, diabetes, or kidney failure for your crested gecko.

 

 

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