how often do crested geckos shed

how often do crested geckos shed

how often do crested geckos shed

Crested geckos are popular pets that shed their skin regularly for growth and health reasons.

  • The shedding frequency depends on the age, size, and condition of the gecko, but generally ranges from once a week to once a month.
  • The shedding process takes less than 30 minutes and involves the gecko peeling off and eating its old skin.
  • The signs of shedding include change in skin color, sticking problems, reduced appetite and activity, and hiding or seeking humid areas.
  • The common shedding problems include incomplete sheds, shedding too frequently or infrequently, skin infections or parasites, and hypothyroidism or hormonal imbalance.
  • The solutions for shedding problems include increasing the humidity, supplementing the diet, providing rough surfaces, gently removing the stuck skin, or consulting a veterinarian.

Introduction

Crested geckos are amazing reptiles that have become very popular as pets in recent years. They are easy to care for, have a variety of colors and patterns, and can live up to 20 years in captivity. One of the most fascinating aspects of crested geckos is their shedding process. Unlike mammals, reptiles do not grow new skin cells continuously, but rather shed their old skin periodically to make room for new growth. This process is also called molting or ecdysis, and it is essential for the health and well-being of crested geckos. In this article, we will answer the main question: how often do crested geckos shed and what factors affect their shedding frequency? We will also discuss the shedding process and signs, the common shedding problems and solutions, and some useful tips and tricks to help your crested gecko shed smoothly and comfortably.

Shedding Process and Signs

Crested geckos shed their skin in one piece or in patches, depending on the size and condition of the gecko. They usually do it at night, when they are more active and less disturbed. The shedding process takes less than 30 minutes, and it involves the following steps:

  • The gecko starts by licking off the old skin from its snout, using its tongue and teeth to peel it off.
  • The gecko then rubs against rough objects in its enclosure, such as branches or rocks, to help the old skin come off.
  • As the old skin begins to come off, the gecko will continue to rub and scrape until the entire layer of skin has been shed.
  • The gecko will then eat the old skin, which provides nutrition and prevents leaving traces for predators.

You can watch a video of a crested gecko shedding here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OMQUTpq_Yu4

The signs that indicate that a crested gecko is about to shed are:

  • Change in skin color: The old skin becomes dull, pale, dark, or ashy, while the new skin underneath is bright and vibrant.
  • Sticking problems: The old skin makes it difficult for the gecko to climb or hold onto objects, as it reduces the adhesive ability of the toe pads.
  • Reduced appetite and activity: The gecko may eat less or not at all, and may also be less active or playful, as it prepares for shedding.
  • Hiding or seeking humid areas: The gecko may hide in a dark and moist place, such as a humid hide or a plant, to increase the humidity and facilitate the shedding.

Shedding Frequency and Factors

The general rule is that crested geckos shed more often when they are young and growing, and less often when they are adults and mature. However, the shedding frequency can vary depending on individual factors, such as:

  • Growth rate: The faster the gecko grows, the more often it sheds. This is why hatchlings and juveniles shed more frequently than adults, as they are still developing their body size and mass.
  • Gender: Female geckos may shed more often than male geckos, especially during the breeding season, as they produce eggs and need more calcium and nutrients.
  • Illness: Sick or injured geckos may shed more or less often than normal, depending on the type and severity of the illness or injury. For example, skin infections or parasites may cause more frequent shedding, while metabolic or digestive issues may cause less frequent shedding.
  • Nutrition: The quality and quantity of the diet can affect the shedding frequency, as it influences the growth and health of the gecko. A balanced and varied diet that includes insects, fruits, and supplements can promote healthy and regular shedding, while a poor or inadequate diet can cause shedding problems or irregularities.
  • Environmental conditions: The temperature and humidity of the enclosure can also affect the shedding frequency, as they affect the skin hydration and elasticity of the gecko. A stable and comfortable temperature range of 72-82°F (22-28°C) and a humidity level of 50-70% can ensure smooth and easy shedding, while extreme or fluctuating temperature or humidity can cause shedding difficulties or complications.

Here is a table that shows the average shedding frequency for different age groups of crested geckos:

Age group Shedding frequency
Hatchlings Once or twice a week
Juveniles Once every two weeks
Adults Once a month

 

 

 

Shedding Problems and Solutions

Sometimes, the shedding process may not go as smoothly as expected, and some problems may arise. These problems can cause discomfort, pain, or even serious health issues for the gecko, so it is important to identify and solve them as soon as possible. The common shedding problems that can occur are:

  • Incomplete sheds: This is when the old skin remains stuck on some body parts, such as the eyes, mouth, toes, tail, or crests. This can happen due to low humidity, poor nutrition, or lack of abrasives in the enclosure.
  • Shedding too frequently or infrequently: This is when the gecko sheds more or less often than normal, depending on the age and size of the gecko. This can happen due to stress, temperature fluctuations, or improper diet, and it can indicate metabolic or digestive issues.
  • Skin infections or parasites: This is when the gecko develops inflammation, itching, or scarring on the skin, due to bacteria, fungi, or mites. This can happen due to high humidity, dirty enclosure, or exposure to other animals, and it can affect the shedding process and the overall health of the gecko.
  • Hypothyroidism or hormonal imbalance: This is when the gecko has a low level of thyroid hormones, which regulate the metabolism and growth of the gecko. This can happen due to genetic or environmental factors, and it can affect the shedding frequency, the reproduction, and the behavior of the gecko.

The possible causes and consequences of each problem are:

  • Incomplete sheds: Low humidity can make the skin dry and hard, making it difficult to peel off. Poor nutrition can make the skin weak and brittle, making it prone to breakage. Lack of abrasives can make the skin stick to the body, making it impossible to rub off. The consequences of incomplete sheds are dehydration, irritation, or loss of digits, as the stuck skin can cut off the blood circulation and cause necrosis or gangrene.
  • Shedding too frequently or infrequently: Stress can make the gecko shed more often, as a way of coping with the situation. Temperature fluctuations can make the gecko shed more or less often, as a way of adapting to the environment. Improper diet can make the gecko shed more or less often, as a way of compensating for the nutritional imbalance. The consequences of shedding too frequently or infrequently are metabolic or digestive issues, such as weight loss or gain, diarrhea or constipation, or organ failure.
  • Skin infections or parasites: High humidity can create a favorable environment for bacteria, fungi, or mites to grow and multiply on the skin. Dirty enclosure can introduce dirt, dust, or feces that can contaminate the skin and cause infections. Exposure to other animals can transmit parasites or diseases that can affect the skin and the immune system. The consequences of skin infections or parasites are inflammation, itching, or scarring, which can impair the shedding process and the appearance of the gecko, as well as lower the resistance to other illnesses.
  • Hypothyroidism or hormonal imbalance: Genetic factors can make the gecko inherit a defective thyroid gland or a mutation that affects the production of thyroid hormones. Environmental factors can make the gecko experience a disruption or a deficiency of thyroid hormones, due to exposure to chemicals, radiation, or medications. The consequences of hypothyroidism or hormonal imbalance are shedding irregularities, reproductive problems, or behavioral changes, which can affect the growth, the fertility, and the temperament of the gecko.

The practical solutions and tips for each problem are:

  • Incomplete sheds: The best way to prevent and treat incomplete sheds is to increase the humidity in the enclosure, by misting the gecko and the substrate daily, using a humidifier or a fogger, or adding live plants or a water dish. Another way is to supplement the diet with calcium and vitamins, which can strengthen the skin and the bones of the gecko. A third way is to provide rough surfaces in the enclosure, such as branches, rocks, or bark, which can help the gecko rub off the old skin. If the skin is still stuck, you can gently remove it with a damp cotton swab or a sauna bath, which involves soaking the gecko in warm water for 10-15 minutes and then peeling off the skin with your fingers or tweezers. However, you should be careful not to hurt or stress the gecko, and avoid pulling the skin too hard or too fast.
  • Shedding too frequently or infrequently: The best way to prevent and treat shedding irregularities is to monitor the temperature in the enclosure, by using a thermometer and a thermostat, and keeping it within the optimal range of 72-82°F (22-28°C). Another way is to reduce the stress in the gecko, by providing a spacious and secure enclosure, avoiding loud noises or bright lights, and handling the gecko gently and infrequently. A third way is to adjust the diet according to the age and size of the gecko, by feeding it insects, fruits, and supplements that are appropriate for its nutritional needs and preferences. If the shedding frequency is still abnormal, you should consult a reptile veterinarian for advice and diagnosis, as it may indicate a serious health problem that requires medical treatment.
  • Skin infections or parasites: The best way to prevent and treat skin infections or parasites is to lower the humidity in the enclosure, by misting the gecko and the substrate less often, using a dehumidifier or a fan, or removing live plants or a water dish. Another way is to clean the enclosure and accessories regularly, by removing any waste or debris, disinfecting the surfaces and objects, and replacing the substrate and the water. A third way is to treat the gecko with antiseptic or anti-parasitic products, such as creams, sprays, or drops, that can kill or repel the bacteria, fungi, or mites. However, you should always follow the instructions and precautions of the products, and consult a reptile veterinarian before using them, as some of them may be harmful or ineffective for the gecko.
  • Hypothyroidism or hormonal imbalance: The best way to prevent and treat hypothyroidism or hormonal imbalance is to consult a reptile veterinarian for diagnosis and treatment, as this is a complex and rare condition that requires professional attention and care. The veterinarian may perform blood tests, x-rays, or ultrasounds to determine the level and the cause of the thyroid hormone deficiency or disruption, and prescribe medication, surgery, or radiation therapy to correct it. The veterinarian may also advise you on how to modify the diet and the environment of the gecko, to support its recovery and well-being.

Conclusion

In conclusion, crested geckos are amazing reptiles that have a unique and fascinating shedding process. They shed their skin regularly to make room for new growth and to maintain their health and well-being. The shedding frequency varies depending on the age, size, and condition of the gecko, but generally ranges from once a week to once a month. The shedding process takes less than 30 minutes and involves the gecko peeling off and eating its old skin. The signs of shedding include change in skin color, sticking problems, reduced appetite and activity, and hiding or seeking humid areas. The common shedding problems include incomplete sheds, shedding too frequently or infrequently, skin infections or parasites, and hypothyroidism or hormonal imbalance. The solutions for shedding problems include increasing the humidity, supplementing the diet, providing rough surfaces, gently removing the stuck skin, or consulting a veterinarian. We hope that this article has answered your question: how often do crested geckos shed and what factors affect their shedding frequency? We also hope that you have learned some useful tips and tricks to help your crested gecko shed smoothly and comfortably. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to share them below or on our social media pages. Thank you for reading and happy shedding!

FAQs

Here are some frequently asked questions that people also ask on Bing about crested gecko shedding:

  • How long does it take for a crested gecko to shed?
    • Answer: It usually takes less than 30 minutes for a crested gecko to shed its skin, but it can vary depending on the size and condition of the gecko. Some geckos may shed faster or slower than others, and some may shed in one piece or in patches. You can tell that your gecko is done shedding when it has no more old skin on its body and when it has eaten the old skin.
  • Do crested geckos need a humid hide to shed?
    • Answer: Crested geckos do not need a humid hide to shed, but they may benefit from having one in their enclosure. A humid hide is a small box or container filled with moist substrate, such as sphagnum moss or coco fiber, that provides a humid and dark place for the gecko to hide and shed. It can help prevent incomplete sheds and dehydration, especially in dry or cold climates. You can make your own humid hide by cutting a hole in a plastic container and filling it with moist substrate, or you can buy one from a pet store or online. You should mist the humid hide daily and change the substrate weekly to keep it clean and fresh.
  • Why is my crested gecko shedding so much?
    • Answer: If your crested gecko is shedding more often than usual, it could be due to several reasons, such as rapid growth, stress, temperature fluctuations, or improper diet. You should check the age, size, and health of your gecko, and make sure to provide a balanced and varied diet, a stable and comfortable temperature, and a stress-free and clean environment. If the problem persists, you should consult a reptile veterinarian for advice and diagnosis, as it may indicate a serious health problem that requires medical treatment.
  • How can I tell if my crested gecko has a skin infection or parasite?
    • Answer: Some signs that your crested gecko may have a skin infection or parasite include redness, swelling, itching, scabs, blisters, or pus on the skin, loss of appetite or weight, lethargy or depression, or abnormal behavior. You should inspect your gecko’s skin regularly, especially after shedding, and look for any signs of injury or infection. You should also keep the enclosure and accessories clean and disinfected, and avoid contact with other animals that may carry parasites. If you suspect that your gecko has a skin infection or parasite, you should seek veterinary treatment as soon as possible.

 

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